Kathmandu Valley

Kathmandu Valley

The Buddhist version gives credit for the origin of the valley to sage Manjushri who came from China to worship at Swayambhu. He struck a deep cleft in the southern Hills with his divine scimitar and drained off the water, making the valley habitable for human settlement. As if to corroborate the legend the logo of Kathmandu Metropolitan City depicts the divine sword of Sage Manjushri.

There are Hindu and Buddhist legends behind the origin of the Kathmandu Valley. According to the former, for a long, this valley was a huge pristine lake. Lord Krishna of the Mahabharata age came here and sliced the lowest part of the southern hills with his divine discus (Sudarshan Chakra) allowing the water to flow out, making the valley possible for humans settlement. The cowherds (Gopals) who accompanied him settled here and were the first inhabitant of the valley.

Kathmandu Valley consists of three-man cities of great historic and cultural interest: Kathmandu, Lalitpur (Patan), and Bhaktapur (Bhadgaon). Situated at an altitude of 1336 meters above sea level, the Kathmandu Valley covers an area of 218 sq. miles. The major tourist attractions in Kathmandu include.